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Orlando Lightfoot

Lightfoot put the ball in the basket better than anyone ever has at Idaho. The all-time leading scorer for Idaho and the Big Sky Conference, Lightfoot dropped 2,102 points in his career from 1991-94. Lightfoot’s name is a common occurrence in the Idaho record book with 13 bearing his name. He holds three of Idaho’s top four single-season scoring performances with the top mark of 715 points in 1993, and four of the top six single-game performances, which includes an unforgettable 50-point outburst against Gonzaga in 1993 – the only 50-point game in school history. Lightfoot’s career scoring total is 500 points more than the second-best mark, even though he only played three seasons for the Vandals. He is the only player in Idaho history to average more than 20 points per game in a career and his 23.1 average is nearly four points per game better than the next best total. He made 813 field goals in his career – nobody else has come close to 700. Lightfoot was a two-time Big Sky Most Valuable Player (1993 and 1994), was the Big Sky Top Newcomer in 1992 and was a Big Sky All-Conference First Team selection all three years. He led the Vandals to a 24-8 record and a Big Sky title in 1993. He was also a two-time Sports Illustrated national player of the week on Feb 17, 1992 and Feb. 15, 1993. He led the Vandals to a 60-32 record in his career. After Idaho, he enjoyed a solid career playing professionally in Europe from 1994-2007, where he earned spots in numerous all-star games and all-league teams.

James “Doc” Lynn

Doc graduated from Wallace High School in 1950 where he lettered in football and basketball.  It was in Wallace the he developed his competitive, caring, hard working nature.  He attended the University of Idaho then off to St. Louis to begin his master’s degree in dentistry graduating from the University of Washington in 1959.  After serving as a Captain in the United States Army and working as an Army dentist he arrived back in Wallace to start his dental practice.  Doc devoted most of his time to the youth of his city.

Doc coached 8 years in Little League then 8 years in Babe Ruth Baseball serving as president of the baseball league for 8 years. He served as president of the Idaho Ski Club at Lookout Pass and president of the Mighty Mite Racing Team for 12 years.  He was president of the Wallace Youth Association for 30 years and a Cub Scout leader.  Doc was president of the Wallace High PTA, and Wallace Gyro Club.  Of all the hats he wore he was the most proud of the 30 years he spent as the youth activities leader at the Wallace Elks Lodge where he organized and directed the Hoop Shoot, Drug Awareness, Teen of the Month, Youth Scholarships, and Drug Stompers Club for local 6th and 7th graders In 1990 Jim started the Hall of Fame for Wallace High School.

Jim was awarded Honorable Lifetime Membership to the Idaho State Elks Club where he was also appointed Grand Tiler. .  While in Wallace he served as Exalted Ruler twice, and was a trustee.  He was state president and a state trustee.  Doc served on many state and national lodge committees.  Doc served on the Elks Rehabilitation Hospital Board and was a Chain of Hospital Board Trustee for two years.

In 2000 Doc was asked by Carl Kiilsgaard to take over the reins for the Idaho Athletic Hall of Fame and the North Idaho Sports Banquet.  His hard work and dedication has transformed the annual sports banquet into the largest such banquet in Idaho.

These just scratch the surface of the contributions Jim has made over the years.  His civic endeavors are unsurpassed.  A remarkable part of his legacy is that through all the work he had fun.  He changed people; he helped a community and he loved life.  Along the way he always had the support of his now deceased wife, Marietta and his four children, John-Laurie-Amy and Ken. He enjoys his grandchildren Jimmy, Christina, Aliah, Danny, Kimberly, Aaron, Mariah, and Jake and attends all their many events. Jim currently lives in Hayden with his new bride Marion.

As the saying goes “You can take the boy out of Wallace, but you can’t take Wallace out of the boy”…this is so true for Jim,  who continues to do all he can to support the Wallace Elks and other Valley endeavors.

So this is Doc’s bio, but it really doesn’t capture the true essence of Jim “Doc” Lynn—his motto was and still is, “How can I help? What do you need?” Not for praise like this award, but because that’s just who he is; one of the good guys, a true Wallace and Idaho hero.

Scott Linehan

Linehan was born and raised in Sunnyside, Washington, about three hours southeast of Seattle, in the lower Yakima Valley of eastern Washington. He was a three-year starter at quarterback at Sunnyside High School, where his father was principal. Linehan graduated in 1982 and accepted a scholarship to play college football at the University of Idaho in Moscow. He was a member of Dennis Erickson’s first recruiting class as a collegiate head coach. Linehan’s brothers, Ron and Rick, had played at Idaho in the 1970s, and were team leaders on defense.

Linehan was a quarterback for the Vandals under head coaches Erickson (1982–85) and Keith Gilbertson. He redshirted in 1982 and was the back-up to senior All-American Ken Hobart in 1983. Linehan became the starter in 1984 as a redshirt sophomore, but broke his clavicle early in the second game and missed most of that game and two additional starts. The Vandals struggled to a 2–5 record, then won four straight to finish 6–5 and third in the Big Sky. The season concluded with a 37–0 victory in the rivalry game with Boise State in Bronco Stadium.

Linehan led the Vandals to a 5–1 record as a starter in 1985, then a stress fracture in his right foot required surgery and sidelined him for the season. Idaho won the Big Sky title and had consecutive Division I-AA playoff appearances in 1985 and 1986. Finally healthy for a full season as a fifth-year senior in 1986, Idaho went 8–3 in the regular season and he threw for 2,954 yards, ending his college career with over 7,000 yards. Not selected in the 1987 NFL Draft, Linehan signed a rookie free agent contract with the Dallas Cowboys in 1987, but a shoulder injury quickly ended his playing career when he was cut at the start of his rookie training camp.

Linehan began his coaching career as a volunteer coach at Sunset High School in Portland in 1987. At this time he also was helping a friend with his business, selling class rings for Jostens. Linehan’s college coaching career began in 1989 as the wide receivers coach at his alma mater under first-year head coach John L. Smith. After two seasons in Moscow, Linehan coached a year at UNLV, two at Idaho again as coordinator, five at Washington in Seattle under Jim Lambright, and three at Louisville under Smith.

Linehan took his first NFL job as the offensive coordinator/ wide receivers coach with the Minnesota Vikings in 2002. After three seasons in Minneapolis, Linehan served in a similar capacity with the Miami Dolphins in 2005 under Nick Saban, then was hired as head coach by the St. Louis Rams on January 19, 2006. On January 9, 2009, Linehan interviewed with the San Francisco 49ers as a candidate for the open offensive coordinator position.

Linehan was announced as the offensive coordinator of the Detroit Lions on January 23, 2009, by new head coach Jim Schwartz.

On January 27, 2014, the Dallas Cowboys hired Linehan to call plays for the offense, and was later given the title of passing game coordinator. Incumbent offensive coordinator and play caller Bill Callahan remained on staff, but relinquinshed play calling duties and was given the new title of running game coordinator. Linehan serves as the de facto offensive coordinator by leading offensive meetings and calling plays during games. He was formally promoted to offensive coordinator upon Callahan’s departure at the end of the season. Linehan had previously worked with Cowboys head coach Jason Garrett when they served as assistants on the staff of Nick Saban’s Miami Dolphins in 2005.

Linehan and his wife of over 20 years, Kristen, have three sons: Matthew, Michael, and Marcus. He is of Irish descent and is a devout Catholic. Matthew and Michael both currently play college football at the University of Idaho, as their father and uncles did. Matthew is a quarterback and Michael is a linebacker.  

Dick Litzinger

Induction Year: 2007

In a football career that spanned eight years, Dick “Litz” Litzinger compiled a number of awards, championships and achievements. Playing at Santa Ana College from 1961-62, Litzinger helped the Dons to an overall record of 17-1-1, including a perfect 10-0 record and National Championship in 1962.

Litzinger was named to the All-Eastern Conference team both years that he played at SAC, was an All-American junior college football player in 1962 and also received the Most Courageous and Most Inspirational awards.

After playing for SAC, Litzinger transferred to the University of Idaho where he continued to receive awards. He was named a coach’s All-American and was a co-captain on the team. During his time at Idaho , he recorded the most tackles on kick-offs.

He then signed on to play professional football with the Calgary Stampeders. He played six games before injuring his knee. Two years later he found his way onto a football field again, being reunited with coach Homer Beatty with the Orange County Rambler. He played 14 games with the Ramblers and the team went on to win the championship game.

Litzinger also had a storied football career at Mater Dei High School, setting the record for most tackles, being named to first team All-CIF and first team All-League in both his junior and senior years. He was also named to the first team All- Orange County team his senior year. During high school he was voted as most inspirational, most valuable and most courageous.

After finishing his football career, Litzinger went on to teach and coach at Mater Dei as well as the Anaheim School District . He also coached and taught in Spokane , Washington up to his retirement in 1979.

Mike Keller

Mike Keller guided Idaho track & field through some of the most successful times in program history. Keller earned Big Sky Coach of the Year honors five times and Big West honors once. He led the men’s track & field team to five Big Sky team titles in 1981, 1983, 1984, 1995 and 1996 and the 1997 MPSF indoor championship. When the team moved into the Big West, Keller’s team made themselves right at home, winning the outdoor championship convincingly. While Keller was head coach, Idaho student-athletes won 116 conference titles, earned six athlete of the year honors and 16 All-America honors.

Dale James

Dale graduated from Pendleton High School in 1956 where he played and lettered 3 years in baseball and basketball.  He was on the league all star team his senior year in basketball.  Dale attended Boise Junior College from 1956 through 1958.  In his freshman year the BJC basketball team went to the National Junior College tournament in Hutchison, Kansas and placed 4th.  He went on play at the University of Idaho where he played basketball for two years.  He received the Oz Thompson Sportsmanship Award in 1960, the Jay Gano Award, Idahonian Outstanding Senior Athlete Award, and Basketball team co-captain in 1961.  He holds the U of I record for highest percentage of free throws made at 87.3%.

He started his coaching career at Lewiston High School in 1962 and coached there until 1968.  He took two teams to the state tournament where they placed 3rd and 4th. He went on to assist Wayne Anderson coach the freshman team at the University of Idaho from 1968 to 1974.  He then went on to coach Eagle Point High School from 1974 to 1976, then Treasure Valley Community College from 1976 to 1978.  He finished his head coaching career at Columbia Basin Community College and in 1980 he placed 2nd at the Washington Community College Athletic Association tournament.

In 1980 Dale purchased the Handy Mart in Post Falls and assisted Rolly Williams at North Idaho College for 8 years.

Dale is married to his wife Barbara and has a son Brett that is deceased.

“Dale James is a living example of how much heart plays in athletics.  Time and again through his prep and college days he outplayed boys and men with bigger and stronger physical equipment, and his friends’ figure he’ll be just as tough to beat in later life as he has been in school.  Hustle and determination pay tremendous dividends no matter where they are used”  Sportswriter in Pendleton

 

 

Dean Lundblad

Induction Year: 2006

E. John Lowell

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J.D. Lawson

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Vernon Law

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