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Sally Greene

Sally Greene graduated from Lewiston High School in 1975 and the University of Idaho in 1979. She participated in basketball and tennis at both schools during the early years of Title IX.  She began her teaching and coaching career at Grangeville High School from 1981-86, coaching basketball and tennis.  Her basketball teams compiled a record of 78-33 and she coached several state champions in tennis and was named Idaho Tennis Coach of the Year for Class B in 1984.

After leaving Grangeville to attend graduate school at the University of Idaho, Greene was hired at Moscow High School in 1988. Over the years she coached tennis, softball, and golf but she is best known for her success in girls’ basketball, where her teams won state championship four out of five years in the 1990’s. During that time, Moscow dominated Intermountain League play, winning 45 consecutive league games and five league championships.  Greene’s teams won three consecutive A-2 state championships in 1992 (22-3), 1993 (23-1), and 1994 (23-2), and narrowly missed a fourth championship in 1995, (finishing 4th after losing to eventual champion Shelley in the final seconds during the first round).  Moscow won their fourth title in five years in 1996 (23-1). Greene retired from coaching in 1996 to pursue a career in administration.  Her career basketball coaching record is 239-90, a winning percentage of 72.6 percent.

With her teams, Greene stressed the importance of sportsmanship, teamwork, effort, respect for the game, and above all, having fun. She coached many players who went on to play Division I College basketball including one All-American (Heather Owen). Greene served on the Women’s Basketball Coaches’ Association’s High School All-American Selection Committee from 1994-96. She is very honored by her selection to the Hall of Fame and would like to thank all of her former athletes and assistant coaches for sharing the journey.

Keith Gilbertson

The son of a high school football coach, Gilbertson grew up in Snohomish, Washington, northeast of Seattle. He graduated from Snohomish in 1966 and attended Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Columbia Basin College, the University of Hawaii, and returned to Central Washington, where he received a bachelor’s degree in social sciences in 1971. He later earned a degree in education from Western Washington University in 1974.

After three stints as a graduate assistant, Gilbertson became an offensive coordinator in 1977 at Utah State under head coach Bruce Snyder. After five seasons in Logan, he joined Dennis Erickson’s new staff at Idaho, who immediately turned the Vandal program around in 1982, going 8–3 in the regular season and advancing to the quarterfinals of the I-AA playoffs. The following spring, Gilbertson departed for the Los Angeles Express of the newly formed USFL, where he coached as offensive coordinator for three seasons. Following the demise of the league, Gilbertson returned to Idaho in 1985, and the Vandals won their first Big Sky Conference title in 14 seasons. Erickson departed for Wyoming in December, and Gilbertson was promoted to head coach of the Vandals program. In his three seasons in Moscow as head coach (1986–88), Gilbertson’s win-loss record was 28–9 (.757). Following consecutive conference championships and advancing to the Division I-AA national semifinals, he accepted an offer to coach the offensive line in the Pac-10 at Washington in Seattle under head coach Don James and offensive coordinator Gary Pinkel. Gilbertson replaced Dan Dorazio, the first assistant coach James had fired at Washington,] after they missed the bowl season for the first time in a decade. (After three wins to start the 1988 season, the Huskies finished 6–5 and 3–5 in conference, with losses to USC, UCLA, Oregon, Arizona, and WSU.) Gilbertson’s three-year stint concluded with the undefeated 1991 national championship team, for which he was also offensive coordinator.

After Washington, Gilbertson became the head coach at California in 1992. Despite leading Cal to a 9–4 record with a decisive victory in the 1993 Alamo Bowl, he was dismissed after his fourth season when the 1995 Bears went 3–8. Gilbertson’s overall record at Cal was 20–26.

After Cal, he was an assistant coach for the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks for three seasons (1996–1998) under Erickson. He would serve as the TE coach for the 1997 and 1998 seasons. In 1999, he returned to the Washington Huskies as an assistant head coach under new head coach Rick Neuheisel.

Gilbertson became the head coach at Washington in 2003 following the abrupt summer dismissal of Neuheisel. He then returned to the Seahawks as an assistant under Mike Holmgren.

Keith is married to his wife Barbara, daughters Ann Gilbertson Haggart and Krissy Gilbertson and son David. He enjoys his two grandchildren Zoe and Julian Happart.

George Greene

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Leon Green

Leon Green played defensive end at Idaho from 1934-36 before defensive statistics were recorded. Green captained the team each of his final two seasons. In 1935, the Vandals boasted a stout defense – never allowing more than 14 points in a game – and Green earned Associated Press All-America honors. After serving in World War II, he returned to work at the University of Idaho where, in 1951, he became Professor and head of the Physical Education Department, a position he held until his retirement in 1978.  Green also served as athletic director from 1973-78, where he raised money and directed the construction of the Kibbie Dome.

Tom Grant

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Abe Goff

A three-year letter winner at center for the Vandals, Goff played football at Idaho from 1921-24. During Goff’s time at U of I, the Vandals were a force on the football field, outscoring their opponents 164-26 in 1923 en route to a third-place finish in the Pacific Coast Conference. In 1924, he helped lead the team to a 13-0 shutout of Oregon, to give the team its first victory over the Ducks. During his time at Idaho, the Vandals dominated border rival Montana, outscoring the Grizzlies by an average of 33.5 points. Goff served in the U.S. Army, doing tours in both the European and Pacific theatres of World War II. He was also elected to Congress in 1946, and served one term.