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John Evans

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Ralph Erickson

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Laune Erickson

Laune Erickson was a standout on Idaho’s national powerhouse boxing program of the 1940s. A three-time NCAA Champion, Erickson won the 1940 crown at 165 pounds, then successfully defended his title again in 1941. After a six-year stint with the armed forces in World War II, he returned to Idaho in 1947 and won the NCAA title at the 175-pound weight class. In addition to his three individual titles, he also helped lead the team to two NCAA team titles. The Vandals won outright NCAA championships in 1940 and 1941. Among the Pacific Coast Conference, Erickson was a two-time titlist in 1940 and 1947 and led the team to a 1940 PCC title.

Dennis Erickson

Dennis Erickson was hired as the head coach at Idaho in December of 1981, and quickly became the winningest coach in Vandal history with 32 wins in four seasons, including two Big Sky championships and two trips to the NCAA Playoffs. Erickson’s offensive-minded teams were highlighted by quarterback-offensive line duos, highlighted by Ken Hobart and Scott Linehan with Tom Cable, and John Friesz with Mark Schlereth. Ignited by Erickson’s arrival in Moscow, the Vandals had 15 consecutive winning seasons (1982-96) and demolished many offensive records. His coaching tree includes notable names such as Jim Mora, Dan Quinn, John L. Smith, and Tommy Tuberville. Erickson never lost to rival Boise State as a head coach, beating the Broncos by a combined score of 150-68. Despite Idaho being his first head coaching job, he brought the Vandals their most successful period in school history. Erickson would later go on to win two national championships at Miami, two Pacific-10 titles at Oregon State and Arizona State, coached the Seattle Seahawks and the San Francisco 49ers.

William English

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Shirley Englehorn

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C. Hec Edmunson

One of the first great athletes at the University of Idaho, Edmundson competed on the track for the Vandals and launched the team onto the national stage when he and two other athletes traveled to the Lewis and Clark Exposition Games against the top schools in the Northwest. Newspapers wrote that Edmundson “impressed with his graceful form and unfaltering determination.” He represented the United States at the Olympic Games in London in 1908 and in Stockholm in 1912 to become the first Idahoan to compete in the Olympic Games. After his athletic success, Edmundson came back to Idaho as a coach for both track and basketball. It was the play of his basketball teams that led to Idaho’s “Vandals” nickname, when sports writers said they played defense with such intensity and ferocity that they “vandalized” their opponents. He later went on to coach basketball and track & field at the University of Washington, where their basketball arena now bears his name.

Frank Echevarria

A member of the nationally dominant Idaho boxing team, Frank Echevarria earned one national championship (1952) and two Pacific Coast Conference titles (1951 and 1952) at 119 pounds. Echevarria was a four-year letter winner from 1949-52. He helped the Vandals tie for a national team championship in 1950, and take fourth in 1949 and 1951. He also helped the team win three straight Pacific Coast Conference titles from 1949-51. Echevarria claims the highlight of his career was besting undefeated and defending national champion Mac Martinez from San Jose State for the 1952 Pacific Coast Conference title, the same season he became an individual national champion.