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Mike Cox

A 25-year coaching veteran who has been influential in preparing many players for the NFL, Mike Cox is in his second season as the Wildcats’ linebacker coach. A 1989 graduate of the University of Idaho, Cox spent the previous three seasons as Washington’s linebackers coach and, prior to joining the Huskies, worked two seasons (2007-08) for the St. Louis Rams, coaching the secondary and linebackers.

Cox made an instant impact on the Wildcat linebackers in 2012 as he tutored three All-Big 12 performers, including All-American and Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year Arthur Brown. He also helped K-State finish first in the Big 12 in scoring defense as the Wildcats yielded 22.1 points per game and finish second in the conference and 10th in school history in fewest rushing yards allowed per game. In addition, Kansas State’s 376.5 yards allowed per game were the third-fewest in the conference.

Cox was vital to the success at Washington in his three years as he tutored Cort Dennison to All-Pac-12 honors in 2011 before coaching one of the conference’s top linebacker groups in 2010.

In his first season as the UW linebackers coach in 2009, Cox helped oversee one of the Huskies’ strongest units. Washington’s 2009 linebacker corps. Cox also helped coach a defense that made vast improvements over the previous season as opponents’ total offense was reduced by an average of 62 yards per game and opponents scored 12 fewer points per game than in 2008.

Cox, a native of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, joined the UW staff from the St. Louis Rams, where he worked for two seasons. In 2007, he was a defensive quality control/defensive line coach before moving to assistant secondary coach in 2008. After a mid-season coaching change, he became linebackers coach for the Rams. Before his time in the NFL, Cox spent four seasons as linebackers coach at Michigan State, where he was also recruiting coordinator in 2006.

Much of Cox’s coaching career has been spent on the various coaching staffs of John L. Smith. In all, Cox served 17 seasons on a Smith staff at Michigan State, Louisville, Utah State and Idaho.

He coached the linebackers for five seasons at Louisville (1998-2002), helping the Cardinals to consecutive Conference USA championships in 2000 and 2001. He coached three All-CUSA selections and, in 2000, was part of a defense that forced NCAA-best 37 turnovers. The 2002 Louisville team was 17th in the nation in rushing defense and 22nd in total defense.

From 1995-97, he was on the staff at Utah State Utah State won back-to-back Big West Conference championships in 1996 and 1997.

As an assistant at Idaho (1987-94) coaching linebackers and defensive line, Cox helped his alma mater to a combined record of 73-26 (.733) from 1987-94, winning four Big Sky Conference championships and finishing in the top 10 five times. In 1994, the Vandals led the Big Sky in rushing defense, allowing only 65.3 yards per game.

Cox earned four letters as a linebacker at Idaho from 1983-86, starting for three seasons. He played for head coaches Dennis Erickson and Keith Gilbertson. He still ranks among the Vandals’ all-time leaders with 252 career tackles.

Mike played on the undefeated State Championship Coeur d’Alene Football team which coach Herb Criner called his best team ever.  Mike rushed for 202 yards, was a standout on defense and was 25-25 on PAT attempts and kicked 8 field goals,

Cox earned a bachelor’s degree in general studies from Idaho in 1989. He and his wife, Jill, have three children, Zac, Jake and Addison.

Kathy Clark

In 25 years of service to the University of Idaho, Kathy Clark is best known as the woman who built the foundation for women’s athletics at the University of Idaho. Clark served as the Senior Associate Athletic Director and Senior Woman Administrator for the Idaho athletic department and also helped start the Vandal volleyball team in 1974, acting as the first head coach and leading the team to a 22-6 record in their very first season, finishing third in the NCWSA.

Bob Curtis

Bob Curtis long will be remembered as the “Voice of the Vandals.” Curtis was a mainstay in the Idaho press box for 59 years as the announcer for Vandal athletic events. Curtis called an amazing 540 consecutive football games at Idaho – a feat he accomplished despite undergoing hip-replacement surgery during the 2003 season. He pulled double duty through most of his broadcasting career as he also was court side for hundreds of men’s basketball games. Curtis also was recognized literally dozens of times as the Idaho Sportscaster of the Year.

Andrea Lloyd Curry

Induction Year: 2003

Forrest Craner

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Dwight Church

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Ed Cheff

Ed Cheff spent 34 seasons as head baseball coach at Lewis-Clark State College before he retired in September of 2010.  He built one of the most impressive collegiate athletic teams in the nation at any level and led the Warriors to 16 NAIA national titles.

From 1982-1992 the Warriors played in 11 consecutive NAIA National Championship games and won eight—a feat unequalled by a collegiate team at any level in any sport.  Five of these titles were earned in the 1980’s, five more in the 1990’s and six in the new millennium, including three straight during 2006-2008.

Cheff finished with an overall record of 1,705-430 for a .799 winning percentage.  His win total ranks second only to Wichita State’s Gene Stephenson’s 1,724 wins with the same program in all of college baseball.  His win total also is fourth all-time among all college baseball coaches.

Cheff’s accomplishments are nothing short of amazing.  Under his leadership, the Warriors captured 16 NAIA national titles during a 25-year span, won at least 40 games for 30 straight seasons, and produced 121 players who were selected in the Major League Baseball Draft, including 14 who have make it to the big leagues as of 2010.

LCSC went to the NAIA World Series a record 28 times under Cheff, more than double than any other NAIA program.  Of those 28 appearances, LCSC finished fourth or higher 25 times.

Cheff not only built successful collegiate baseball teams but also worked to instill a sense of pride and work ethic in each Warrior that came through the program.  Warrior Baseball is valued by the local community for its dedication to active involvement with local events, fundraisers, and volunteer programs.  The impact of the program is noteworthy both on and off the field.

Cheff was named NAIA Coach of the Year eight times and he still often addresses clinics outside the Lewis-Clark Valley.  He has addressed the American Baseball Coaches Association on six occasions and was inducted into the NAIA Hall of Fame in 1994 and the ABCA Hall of Fame in 2006

In 2009, Cheff was named the winner of the ABCA’s 2009 Lefty Gomez Award for his lifetime contribution to amateur baseball.  Cheff coached Team USA in 1994 as its hitting and third base coach at the World Championships. Cheff’s teams produced 72 NAIA All Americans and three NAIA Players of the Year.

Cheff, who was raised in Butte, came to LSCS after a successful coaching career at Lower Columbia Community College and replaced Ramon Hooker at LCSC following the 1976 season. One of the trademarks of Cheff’s teams was their mental toughness.

Ed and his wife Karen have three sons-Trevor, Tyler and Toby.

 

Wendell Christensen

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Joe Chapman

Induction Year: 2001

Earl Chandler

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